Grooming Your Dog

Grooming Your Dog

Groom & bond at the same time

Your dog will love you for it!

Dogs love to feel clean and tidy

Have you noticed how often your dog licks himself clean?

Unless your dog gets caked in mud, and your nose say different, then the general rule of thumb is to wash your dog once every 3 – 4 weeks. If it rolls in fox poo, then it’s obviously time for a bath!

Three factors will determine how often you bathe your dog.

  1. Activity level or lifestyle
  2. The type of coat
  3. Health

Smooth coated dogs like greyhounds for example can easily be wiped clean using dog wipes between bathing. ( Human / baby wipes are too strong for dogs)

Bath time is a good opportunity to check your dog for any abnormalities like fleas, bumps, and scratches.

Skin issues like fungal infections, allergies, parasites, bacterial infections, and dry skin can be treated with medicated shampoo.

Your vet can advise you of your dog’s specific needs.

Dog brushing is an important part of your dog’s care.

You should make brushing your dog part of your weekly routine. At least once a week and daily for long haired dogs to prevent matting.  This will help to keep your dog’s coat clean between baths.

Brushing your dog both stimulates the skin to produce vital protective oils and gives you an opportunity to bond with your dog. If you start at early age your dog will get used to it and may well even start to enjoy it! Brush your dog after walks as leaves and grass seeds among other things can easily find their way into your dog’s coat, ears or paws and become irritating, painful or form into mats. Check problem areas such as behind the ears, under the armpits, the groin, and tummy areas.

Don’t forget about your dog’s nails, teeth & nails!

Trimming your dog’s nails is important and should be done every 4 -6 weeks ( Heavier dogs may go longer as their nails are more likely to get worn down on pavement.) As the dog’s nails grow so do the veins in the nails. If the nails grow too long they can cause a lot of discomfort to your dog, especially if the nail grows into the paw pad. You can imagine how painful it would be for your dog to walk around.

Cleaning your dog’s ears will prevent ear infections, ear mites and build up dirt.

Teeth brushing is important to prevent gum disease. 

Grooming Your Dog - Tips & Videos

Nail Clipping

Ear Cleaning

Smooth Coat

American_Staffordshire_Terrier

American Staffordshire Terrier, American Foxhound, Basset Hound, Basenji, Beagle, Belgian Malinois, Boston Terrier, Bull Mastif, Bulldog, Boxer, Chihuahua (short haired), Dachshund (smooth) Dalmatian, Doberman Pinscher, English Bulldog, French Bull Dog, German Shorthaired Pointer, Great Dane, Greyhound, Ibizan Hound (smooth), Italian Greyhound, Manchester Terrier, Miniature Pinscher, Miniature Bull Terrier, Pointer, Pharaoh Hound, Pug, Rottweiler, Rhodesian Ridgeback, Saluki, Staffordshire Bull Terrier, Vizsla, Weimaraner,  Whippet.

Smooth haired dogs are quite low maintenance. They don’t need daily brushing, but it’s good to do it as often as you can.

Smooth haired coat is very short across the body and sheds constantly.

Use a good quality de-shedding shampoo like the Furminator Ultra-Premium – which uses natural ingredients to moisturise the coat and strengthen the hair shafts to help reduce shedding.

Pay close attention to the dog’s feet, back end and face when washing. Rinse the shampoo off well and then use a good quality de-shedding conditioner which will help to reduce any excessive shedding by releasing hair from the undercoat while washing. Dry off your dog with a super absorbent towel. You can use a massage glove or rubber brush to remove excessive hair. This will that give the coat an extra shine. If your dog sheds a lot, you can use the

Use the Furminator grooming tool in-between grooming sessions at home will remove your dog’s undercoat and reduce shedding by 90% by removing any loose hair.

Short Coat

Chinese Shar-Pei

American Foxhound, Australian Cattle Dog, Belgian Malinois, Canaan Dog,  Basset Hound, Beagle, Bloodhound, Bullmastiff, Chinese Shar-Pei, Curly-Coated, English Foxhound,Fox Terrier (smooth), Greater Swiss Mountain Dog, Mastiff, Retriever, Labrador Retriever,  Rottweiler, Parsons Russell,  Pug.

Smooth haired dogs are quite low maintenance. They don’t need daily brushing, but it’s good to do it as often as you can.

Smooth haired coat is very short across the body and sheds constantly.

Use a good quality de-shedding shampoo like the Furminator Ultra-Premium – which uses natural ingredients to moisturise the coat and strengthen the hair shafts to help reduce shedding.

Pay close attention to the dog’s feet, back end and face when washing. Rinse the shampoo off well and then use a good quality de-shedding conditioner which will help to reduce any excessive shedding by releasing hair from the undercoat while washing. Dry off your dog with a super absorbent towel. You can use a massage glove or rubber brush to remove excessive hair. This will that give the coat an extra shine. If your dog sheds a lot, you can use the Use the Furminator grooming tool in-between grooming sessions at home will remove your dog’s undercoat and reduce shedding by 90% by removing any loose hair.

Short haired dogs shed a lot, but the hairs are small. You should brush your dog’s coat once a week.

Long Coat

Grooming Your Dog

Afghan Hound, Bearded Collie, Briard, Old English Sheepdog, Skye Terrier, Lhasa Apso, Lowchen, Tibetan Terrier, Chinese Crested – powderpuff, Chihuahua long haired, Havanese, Maltese, Shin Tzu,  Yorkshire Terrier.

Long haired coated dogs should be bathed once a week and finished with a good leave in dog conditioner once they have been towel dried.

 Your dog should be combed and brushed every day where possible to keep the coat healthy, long and tangle free to avoid matting. If this occurs your dog will suffer from skin inflammation and irritation and may have to have its hair shaved off.

If you’re drying your dog’s hair at home, you can use a hairdryer on a low cool – medium setting far enough away from the dog’s body to not cause any skin burn.

You can use a soft Slicker brush to do line brushing – pulling the dog’s hair apart and brushing the dog’s undercoat. Working in the direction of the hair, divide and brush in small sections at a time.

Being extra careful around the eye and nose area. Protect the eye while you brush, and then comb outwards. Comb through all the hair after brushing.

It’s a lot of work looking after a long-haired dog, so you might like to use a professional groomer once every 4 – 6 weeks to keep your dog in excellent condition

Silky Coat

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English Setter, Gordon Setter, Cocker Spaniel, Irish Setter, Clumber Spaniel, Field Spaniel, English Cocker Spaniel, English Springer Spaniel, Welsh Springer Spaniel.

Your dog’s silky coat is very delicate, so you need to be incredibly careful not to break it when grooming.

Silky coated breeds have shorter hair on the face, body, head, and the front of their front and back legs. The long hair can be seen on their ears, under carriage, tail, front and back legs.

Bath your dog in a quality dog shampoo and conditioner. If you’re drying your dog’s hair at home, you can use a hairdryer on a low heat setting far enough away from the dog’s body to not cause any skin burn.

The long hair can easily become tangled and matted; therefore, you should brush your dog regularly, at least 3 times a week to avoid this. Matted hair can become extremely uncomfortable for your dog causing skin irritation and swelling – and the only way to remove this is by shaving your dog’s hair off.

A medium slicker brush can be used gently to give your dog a soft shiny coat and remove any tangles or matted hair. Whilst using this brush massaging the skin will improve healthy circulation. Once all your dog’s hair has been brushed, you can then co over with a comb to remove any remaining tangle.

A professional groomer can remove any dead hair by:

hand stripping your dog – This is a time-consuming process where the dead hair is plucked out by hand or with a stripping stone to promote new growth. It keeps the colour and texture of the coat nice.

Clipping your dog’s coat – Is a much quicker process.

Professional grooming should be carried out regularly approximately every 6 -8 weeks.

Double Coat

Grooming Your Dog

Akita, Alaskan Malamute, Anatolian Shepherd, Siberian Husky, Norwegian Elkhound, Collie – smooth coated, German Shepherd, Cardigan Welsh Corgi, Pembroke Welsh Corgi, Finnish Spitz, Schipperke, Shiba Inu.

The double coated breed is fairly easy to look after and doesn’t need to see a dog groomer on a regular basis.

They have a hard top coat and a soft, dense under coat that protects the dog in extreme weather conditions. Some of the double coated breeds can produce a body oil that makes the coat smell, requiring your dog to be washed once a week. Other double coated dogs that have natural oils and don’t absorb smells only need to be washed once every three months.

Use a good quality shampoo and conditioner, detangling solution or a de-shedding waterless spray like the one from Furminator. This is a good quick option, and good for restless or big dogs. The shampoo sprays directly on to the coat and removes and dead fur or excess dirt.  Rub it in well and leave. As it’s waterless you don’t need to wash it off and it gives your dog a lovely fresh smelling coat. 

Brush your dog’s coat once a week, unless they are shedding a lot, then you need to do it more often.

You can use a harsh slicker brush or a Les Pooches brush which has a flexible head, for brushing dead hair away from the under carriage. Pay special attention to the neck and back-end area where the coat is much thicker. Come through the dense coat.

Make sure your dog is dried off completely. In humid weather mildew can build up causing bad odour and skin infections.

Don’t shave off the fur on your dog in summer when the undercoat has been shed. The top coat will keep your dog cool and without it your dog could be prone to heat stroke.

Curly Coat

dog_grooming_tips

Irish Water Spaniel, Afghan Hound, American Water Spaniel, Skye Terrier, Kerry Blue Terrier, Soft-Coated Wheaten Terrier, Bedlington, Portuguese Water Dog, Lhasa Apso, Lowchen, Tibetan Terrier, Bichon Frise, Curly coated Retriever, Chinese Crested – powderpuff, Maltese, Bouvier des Flandres, Old English Sheepdog.

Corded hair – Komondo, Puli, Havanese, Poodle.

Curly and wavy coat types don’t shed but they do need a lot of work to groom. Their coat should be brushed daily for 15minutes, to keep it in good condition.

The brushing of this type of coat should be firm and gentle so as not to cause any skin irritation or discomfort to your dog.

Curly coated dogs fur has a tendency to become dry and tangle easily. Use a leave in conditioner before brushing with a soft slicker brush.  Remove all the dead hair and any matting by going all the way down to the skin and brushing from the end outwards.

Take particular care when brushing the ears, tail and legs as these parts are most prone to tangling.

Once your dog has been brushed, then run a comb through the hair. Be careful if your comb comes to a stop. At this point there will be a knot in the hair and will require careful brushing out before you continue with the comb.

You use a hairdryer on a cool setting to dry your dog. Be careful not to have the dryer to close to the dog so you don’t burn the skin. Whilst drying use a soft Slicker brush in your other hand to do line brushing – pulling the dog’s hair apart and brushing the dog’s undercoat. Working in the direction of the hair, divide and brush in small sections at a time

Dogs with a corded coat like the Puli don’t need regular bathing. The cords repel water and rinsing out the shampoo or completely drying the cords out is very difficult. The dreadlocks themselves do however require a lot of maintenance and best left to a professional groomer.

Wire Coat

Grooming Your Dog
dog_grooming_tips

Airedale Terrier, Affenpinscher, Australian Terrier, Border Terrier, Brussels Griffon, Cairn Terrier, Dandie Dinmont, Fox Terrier – wire, Irish Terrier, Lakeland Terrier, Miniature Schnauzer, Norfolk Terrier, Parsons Russel, Scottish Terrier, Sealyham Terrier, Welsh Terrier, West Highland Terrier,, Affenpinscher, Brussels Griffon, German Wirehaired Pointer, Spinone Italiano, Wirehaired Pointing Griffon, Dachshund- wire haired, Irish Wolfhound, Otterhound, Petit Basset Griffon Vendeen, Scottish Deerhound, Scottish Terrier,  Giant Schnauzer, Standard Schnauzer.

Wiry coated dogs don’t shed their hair at all, but to keep their coats in good condition, it does require maintenance.

Wash your dog in good quality dog shampoo and conditioner and dry with a hairdryer on a low heat setting. Keep the dryer far enough away to not burn your dog’s skin.

Brush your dog gently using a soft slicker brush in the direction of the hair.

A professional dog groomer can hand strip your dog. This should be done every 6 – 12 weeks

hand stripping is a time-consuming process where the dead hair is plucked out by hand or with a stripping stone to promote new growth.  It keeps the colour and texture of the coat nice.

It’s important to brush your dog’s hair inbetween trips to the groomers.